UTS launches Hydrogen Energy Program

UTS
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The University of Technology Sydney (UTS) has launched The Hydrogen Energy Program to support the enormous potential for Australia of hydrogen as a competitive, low carbon energy alternative.

This program establishes a hydrogen team of leading experts from throughout the Faculty of Engineering and IT, and the Institute for Sustainable Futures. They combine highly complementary skills with solid connections with industry, academia, and government agencies at home and abroad. There is expertise in generation and storage, transport vectors, economic analysis, safety, policy and regulation, and environmental impacts.

For Australia, hydrogen could support the transition to low emissions energy across electricity, heating, transport and industry, improving the resilience of energy systems and increasing consumer choice. It could also generate major economic benefits through export revenue and new industries, and 3000 new jobs by 2030 according to the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA).

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Dr Zhenguo Huang is the Program Leader at the UTS School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Chair of the International Hydrogen Carriers Alliance.

“The Hydrogen Program aims to create a network to develop Australia’s capacity to lead hydrogen energy development, promote Australia as an international hydrogen energy hub, prepare skilled workers for the emerging global hydrogen economy and connect technology providers with existing and emerging Australian hydrogen producers and overseas markets,” he said.

UTS researchers are already conducting world-class ARC-funded research in hydrogen storage that aims to address one key challenge for storing and delivering large amounts of hydrogen, and have established collaborations with industry partners including KOGAS, and a commercial research partnership with Boron Molecular.

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