Hydro Tasmania: Business, government and researchers collaborate on climate

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Hydro Tasmania, in partnership with the Tasmanian Climate Change Office and the CSIRO hosted the third Tasmanian Climate Symposium, presented online from Hobart, on October 16.

Targeted at key decision makers, scientists and other experts from government and industry, the symposium was designed to showcase how business and industry are responding to climate change, sparking thought-provoking discussions and building relationships with researchers.

The symposium showcased businesses that are already managing climate variability, preparing for and adapting to climate change, and the world-class Tasmanian researchers exploring these impacts.

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Hydro Tasmania CEO Evangelista Albertini said that changes in climate are already evident in Tasmania.

“As Australia’s largest renewable energy generator, we recognise the importance of responding to climate change,” Mr Albertini said.

“We rely on water to generate electricity so understanding how our climate is changing, and particularly the impact on rainfall, is very important for managing our storages. Our understanding of climate science and climate change is used daily in our business, and helps us to maintain Tasmania’s energy security.

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“Business and industry need support to identify the risks that arise as the climate changes, this symposium provides an opportunity for government, industry and researchers to share knowledge and exchange ideas.

“Hydro Tasmania has a long history of investing in research on how climate change will affect Tasmania and we are proud to support research and industry collaboration that helps all of us prepare, respond and adapt.”

This symposium complements other research partnerships Hydro Tasmania has with the Bureau of Meteorology, UTAS and CSIRO which look at a range of climate impacts, including the likelihood of extreme drought and flood events occurring more often, future climate conditions in the Tasmanian highlands, effects of orography on local rainfall patterns and developing seasonal to multiyear (five-10 years) forecasts of potential climate outcomes for Tasmania.